Italy in Crisis After President Blocks Anti-EU Government

Italian president Sergio Mattarella delivers a news conference in Rome, April 5
Italian president Sergio Mattarella delivers a news conference in Rome, April 5 (Presidenza della Repubblica)

No Party or Coalition Wins Majority in Italy

  • Italians elected a new parliament on Sunday.
  • The populist Five Star Movement and Northern League made gains at the expense of mainstream parties.
  • Neither the combined right nor a left-right coalition between Matteo Renzi’s Democrats and Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia would have a majority. Read more “No Party or Coalition Wins Majority in Italy”

Left-Right Coalition Would Be Best Outcome for Italy

Italian Democratic Party leader Matteo Renzi visits a police academy in Rome, November 9, 2016
Italian Democratic Party leader Matteo Renzi visits a police academy in Rome, November 9, 2016 (Palazzo Chigi)

There are two realistic outcomes to Italy’s election on Sunday: a right-wing government that includes the xenophobic Brothers of Italy and Northern League or a German-style grand coalition between Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia and the Democrats.

The second would be better for Italy and for Europe. To make that outcome more likely, Italians should vote for the center-left. Read more “Left-Right Coalition Would Be Best Outcome for Italy”

Catalans Vote for Independence in Controversial Referendum

Sign demanding a vote for Catalan independence in Girona, Spain, September 22, 2014
Sign demanding a vote for Catalan independence in Girona, Spain, September 22, 2014 (Keith Roper)
  • Spanish prime minister Mariano Rajoy maintains “no self-determination referendum” was held in Catalonia on Sunday, although millions voted.
  • Regional president Carles Puigdemont claims the region has “won the right to be an independent state”.
  • Hundreds of Catalans were injured in altercations with Spanish riot police. Read more “Catalans Vote for Independence in Controversial Referendum”

Merkel Wins Reelection in Germany But Will Need More Parties to Govern

  • Germany could see a three-party “Jamaica” coalition after its election on Sunday.
  • Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats lost support but are still the largest party.
  • The Social Democrats suffered an historic defeat and have ruled out continuing the left-right “grand coalition”.
  • The far-right Alternative for Germany has become the third largest party with strong support from the formerly communist East.
  • The liberal Free Democrats, Greens and far-left Die Linke share fourth place. Read more “Merkel Wins Reelection in Germany But Will Need More Parties to Govern”

Liberal Free Democrats Would Keep Merkel Sharp

Christian Lindner, leader of Germany's Free Democratic Party, gives a news conference in Berlin, January 30, 2018
Christian Lindner, leader of Germany’s Free Democratic Party, gives a news conference in Berlin, January 30, 2018 (Shutterstock)

There is little doubt Angela Merkel will win reelection in Germany on Sunday. Her Christian Democrats are projected to win up to 40 percent support against 25 percent for the second party, the Social Democrats.

The two could continue to share power in a “grand coalition”, but we’re hoping the liberal Free Democrats will win enough seats to help form a center-right government instead.

Polls suggest that the two parties might just fall short of a majority. Conservative and liberal voters who want to keep the left out of power ought to give the Free Democrats their support. Read more “Liberal Free Democrats Would Keep Merkel Sharp”

May to Stay in Power with Support of Northern Ireland Unionists

British prime minister Theresa May speaks with the American defense secretary James Mattis at Lancaster House in London, England, May 11
British prime minister Theresa May speaks with the American defense secretary James Mattis at Lancaster House in London, England, May 11 (DoD/Jette Carr)