Does the British Election Mean Anything for America?

Opinion

Ryan BohlRyan Bohlis a Middle East and North Africa analyst at Stratfor.
British prime minister Theresa May and American president Donald Trump speak in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington DC, January 27
British prime minister Theresa May and American president Donald Trump speak in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington DC, January 27 (The Prime Minister’s Office/Jay Allen)

As always, yes and no.

Yes, because the ideology of austerity-driven neoliberalism, that which is championed by Theresa May’s suddenly flailing government, is a major component of the ruling Republican Party in the United States. It’s what Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House, believes in: cuts to public services to benefit the private market.

Yes, because Brexit, the alt-right-driven anti-immigrant, anti-globalization geopolitical self-harm project is propelled by the same forces that elected the current head of the Republican Party, Donald Trump.

But also no. Read more “Does the British Election Mean Anything for America?”

Election Divides Kingdom as Parties Consolidate Their Base

Analysis

David DowningDavid Downingis a British political analyst.
The British flag flies over the Houses of Parliament in London, England
The British flag flies over the Houses of Parliament in London, England (Unsplash/Matt Milton)

There is still a lot to digest from last week’s British election. The promised Conservative landslide never materialized. Labour gained seats, including in affluent constituencies like Kensington that it won for the first time, but it also fell short of a majority. Theresa May remains in power but has been weakened. She must rely on the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland for a majority, which threatens to upset the delicate balance of power in Ulster.

We can nevertheless say two things with certainty:

  1. The trends spotted in last year’s Brexit vote are accelerating.
  2. The new poles in British politics are consolidating and that leaves the center wide open. Read more “Election Divides Kingdom as Parties Consolidate Their Base”

Conservatives Need to Reevaluate Beliefs After Defeat

Britain's then-home secretary, Theresa May, speaks at a mosque in East London, England, February 12, 2015
Britain’s then-home secretary, Theresa May, speaks at a mosque in East London, England, February 12, 2015 (UK Home Office)

Given the vote share Labour has accrued in England under Jeremy Corbyn, ideas from Britain’s mid- to late-twentieth century are once again mainstream — and they pose an ideological challenge to the liberal consensus that is in many ways deeper than last year’s vote to leave the EU. Read more “Conservatives Need to Reevaluate Beliefs After Defeat”

What Good Is a Two-Party System If It Doesn’t Provide Stability?

Opinion

Nick OttensNick Ottensis the founder and editor of the Atlantic Sentinel.
View of the Houses of Parliament in London, England, December 21, 2011
View of the Houses of Parliament in London, England, December 21, 2011 (Ben Sutherland)

There is a lazy assumption in much of the British election coverage that the return of two-party politics was the only good news of the night.

Between them, the Conservatives and Labour won 82 percent support on Thursday, up from 67 percent in 2015.

Yet neither party has a majority. The biggest party is in disarray. The second has no way to form a government. It is quite likely there will be another election later this year or next. Read more “What Good Is a Two-Party System If It Doesn’t Provide Stability?”

Second Scottish Referendum Unlikely After Voters Punish SNP

Analysis

Nick OttensNick Ottensis the founder and editor of the Atlantic Sentinel.
Statue of a unicorn in Edinburgh, Scotland, March 11, 2014
Statue of a unicorn in Edinburgh, Scotland, March 11, 2014 (byronv2)

A second Scottish independence referendum seems unlikely after the region’s separatists lost almost half their seats in Britain’s general election.

The Scottish National Party won 56 of Scotland’s 59 seats in Westminster in 2015 but lost 21 of them on Thursday.

Among those defeated were Angus Robertson, the SNP frontman, and Alex Salmond, the former first minister of Scotland. Read more “Second Scottish Referendum Unlikely After Voters Punish SNP”

May to Stay in Power with Support of Northern Ireland Unionists

Live

Atlantic SentinelAtlantic Sentinelis a transatlantic opinion website.
British prime minister Theresa May speaks with the American defense secretary James Mattis at Lancaster House in London, England, May 11
British prime minister Theresa May speaks with the American defense secretary James Mattis at Lancaster House in London, England, May 11 (DoD/Jette Carr)

What Britain’s General Election Result Means

Explainer

Nick OttensNick Ottensis the founder and editor of the Atlantic Sentinel.
London England
View of the Houses of Parliament from Whitehall in London, England (Shutterstock/Alan Copson)

Britain’s ruling Conservatives are projected to lose control of Parliament. The exit poll for Thursday’s election shows them falling from 330 to 314 seats. Twelve more are needed for a majority.

Assuming the exit poll isn’t too far off, what does this mean for Britain’s next government, its major political parties and the process of divorcing the United Kingdom from the EU? Read more “What Britain’s General Election Result Means”

Conservatives Lose Majority in British Election

Live

Atlantic SentinelAtlantic Sentinelis a transatlantic opinion website.
  • Britain’s ruling Conservatives have lost their majority in parliamentary elections, but they remain the largest party with 317 out of 650 seats.
  • They can probably stay in power with the support of the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland, which has ten seats.
  • Labour won 40 percent support nationwide and 261 seats, up 29. Read more “Conservatives Lose Majority in British Election”

Liberal Democrats Are the Least Bad Option in Britain’s Election

Endorsement

Atlantic SentinelAtlantic Sentinelis a transatlantic opinion website.
British Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron
British Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron (Shutterstock/Finbarr Webster)

This British election is an impossible choice for liberals like us.

We can’t possibly support Jeremy Corbyn, whose policies of nationalization and unilateral nuclear disarmament would compound the disaster of Brexit — which he did far too little to prevent — many times over.

But we are not impressed with Theresa May either. She was the best possible candidate to succeed David Cameron last summer, but only because the alternatives were worse. Many British voters could make the same calculation this week. Read more “Liberal Democrats Are the Least Bad Option in Britain’s Election”