Both Sides Claim Victory in Catalonia

Catalan president Carles Puigdemont speaks with his predecessor, Artur Mas, in Barcelona, Spain, February 12, 2016
Catalan president Carles Puigdemont speaks with his predecessor, Artur Mas, in Barcelona, Spain, February 12, 2016 (Generalitat de Catalunya/Jordi Bedmar)

Both separatists and unionists are claiming victory in Catalonia after the election on Thursday gave a majority of the seats (seventy out of 135) but not the votes (47.5 percent) to the former.

The view from abroad is that nobody won. Read more “Both Sides Claim Victory in Catalonia”

What Happens Next in Catalonia?

View of the Palau Nacional from downtown Barcelona, Spain, December 29, 2013
View of the Palau Nacional from downtown Barcelona, Spain, December 29, 2013 (CucombreLibre)

Separatist parties defended their majority in Catalonia’s regional parliament on Thursday, but only by a whisker. The parties that want to secede from Spain won seventy out of 135 seats against 57 for the unionists.

Catalonia in Common, a left-wing party that rejects both independence and Spain’s suspension of Catalan home rule, won the remaining eight seats. Read more “What Happens Next in Catalonia?”

Our Catalan Election Day Live Blog and Reading List

Palau de la Generalitat Barcelona Spain
The palace of the Catalan regional government in Barcelona, Spain at night (iStock/Tomas Sereda)

On Thursday, the Atlantic Sentinel will be providing live analysis and commentary of the election in Catalonia.

In addition to updating you on the results, our focus will be on analysis and opinion. We’ll be reading the local, European and international coverage of the election and share (and where necessary translate) interesting takes for you.

I hope you’ll join us! We’ll kick off around noon Central European Time. Read more “Our Catalan Election Day Live Blog and Reading List”

Everything You Need to Know About the Election in Catalonia

Palau de la Generalitat Barcelona Spain
The palace of the Catalan regional government in Barcelona, Spain at night (iStock/Tomas Sereda)

Catalans will elect a new regional parliament on December 21. Here is everything you need to know about the election.

Bottom lines

  • The only real issue is whether or not to continue the independence process.
  • Separatist and unionist parties are evenly matched with the balance going to Catalonia in Common, a left-wing party that rejects both independence and Spain’s suspension of Catalan home rule.
  • If the separatists defend their majority and attempt to form another government, there are doubts Spain will let them. Read more “Everything You Need to Know About the Election in Catalonia”

Polls Vindicate Puigdemont’s Decision to Form Separatist List

Catalan leaders Oriol Junqueras and Carles Puigdemont, deliver a news conference in Barcelona, Spain, March 1
Catalan leaders Oriol Junqueras and Carles Puigdemont, deliver a news conference in Barcelona, Spain, March 1 (Generalitat de Catalunya/Rubén Moreno)

Carles Puigdemont appears to have made the right decision forming a new political entity, called Together for Catalonia, as opposed to leading his center-right European Democratic Party (PDeCAT) into next month’s election.

Two recent polls, one published in El Periódico, the other in ABC newspaper, give the deposed president’s list almost 17 percent support.

That puts it neck and neck with the liberal Citizens and mainstream Socialist Party — both of which oppose Catalan independence — for second place.

Together for Catalonia uses PDeCAT’s infrastructure but has drawn candidates from civil society. Read more “Polls Vindicate Puigdemont’s Decision to Form Separatist List”

Catalan Socialists Choose Opposition Over Deal with Separatists

Spanish Socialist Workers' Party leaders
The federal committee of the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party meets in Madrid, October 23, 2016 (PSOE)

Catalonia’s Socialists have taken themselves out of contention for the next coalition government by refusing deals with parties that, in the words of leader Miquel Iceta, have taken the region “to the brink of the abyss.”

Even if the European Democratic Party and the Republican Left, which jointly ruled Catalonia until the regional government was dissolved by Madrid, renounce secession, the Socialists would still not partner with them, Iceta said in a television interview.

Nor would he commit to a unionist pact with center-right parties, thus condemning the Socialists to four more years in opposition. Read more “Catalan Socialists Choose Opposition Over Deal with Separatists”

Pro- and Anti-Independence Parties Fail to Unite in Catalonia

Oriol Junqueras, the leader of Catalonia's Republican Left, makes a speech in Barcelona, Spain, July 20, 2015
Oriol Junqueras, the leader of Catalonia’s Republican Left, makes a speech in Barcelona, Spain, July 20, 2015 (CDC)

Catalan parties in favor and opposed to seceding from Spain have failed to unite in time for the election in December.

A unionist list proposed by the liberal Ciudadanos has been rejected by the Socialists and People’s Party.

A separatist alliance fell apart when the Republican Left conditioned it on the participation of other left-wing parties. Read more “Pro- and Anti-Independence Parties Fail to Unite in Catalonia”

Catalonia’s Far Left Could Hold the Key to Independence

Mayor Ada Colau and members of the Barcelona city government attend a demonstration, October 13
Mayor Ada Colau and members of the Barcelona city government attend a demonstration, October 13 (Ajuntament Barcelona)

Catalonia’s far left could hold the key to independence after the next regional election.

Snap elections are likely in the next few months, whether called by the regional government to preempt the suspension of home rule or by the Spanish government once home rule is suspended

Polls suggest the ruling center-right European Democratic Party (PDeCAT) will trade places with its junior partner, the Republican Left.

But the balance between pro- and anti-independence parties could be unchanged — unless Catalonia in Common (Barcelona mayor Ada Colau’s party) and Podem (the Catalan branch of Podemos) change sides. Read more “Catalonia’s Far Left Could Hold the Key to Independence”