One Term for Posterity: George H.W. Bush

German chancellor Helmut Kohl, American president George H.W. Bush and their wives meet at Camp David, Maryland, February 24, 1990
German chancellor Helmut Kohl, American president George H.W. Bush and their wives meet at Camp David, Maryland, February 24, 1990 (Bundesregierung)

The history of America is not unlike that of any other nation: its most revered leaders are usually founders and war statesmen.

Historical figures emerging in a time of crisis are always important, but they remain men of their time. It is easy to be revered when the population rallies to the flag and there is no internal opposition. More difficult is to achieve a record of governing efficiency in a time of peace, yet this was exactly the triumph of George Herbert Walker Bush. Read more

Ruud Lubbers Played Small Role in East-West Nuclear Diplomacy

American president George H.W. Bush meets with Dutch prime minister Ruud Lubbers in The Hague, July 17, 1989
American president George H.W. Bush meets with Dutch prime minister Ruud Lubbers in The Hague, July 17, 1989 (Anefo/Rob Croes)

Former Dutch prime minister Ruud Lubbers died on Wednesday at the age of 78. A Christian Democrat, he was the country’s longest-serving prime minister, leading three coalition governments between 1982 and 1994.

I had a chance to interview Lubbers when I interned for the Dutch weekly Elsevier in 2012. We were working on an India edition and Lubbers was known to have a relationship with the Gandhis.

In his flat in Rotterdam, Lubbers told me about his first meeting with Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian prime minister, in 1985. Read more

The Rational Person’s Guide to Fidel Castro

Cuban leader Fidel Castro smokes a cigar in his office in Havana, circa 1977
Cuban leader Fidel Castro smokes a cigar in his office in Havana, circa 1977 (Getty Images/David Hume Kennerly)

There are few leaders who inspire the kind of irrational passion that surrounds the recently-deceased Fidel Castro. He is a hero and a villain and to have an opinion on him so often forces you to choose between the two.

But there is another way to judge leadership. To understand Castro’s true historical legacy, we should think of him geopolitically. Read more

The Death of a King

Bhumibol Adulyadej, the king of Thailand, visits the Netherlands, October 24, 196
Bhumibol Adulyadej, the king of Thailand, visits the Netherlands, October 24, 1960 (Nationaal Archief)

Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej had a long run: from 1946 until today, his living memory involved Japanese occupation, cold warriors burning Vietnam, the self-immolation of Cambodia, the shunning and decades-later rehabilitation of Myanmar and the rise of China.

His death leaves many questions for Thai politics, not the least of which is what to do with the widely disliked crown prince, heir apparent to the throne.

But it also reveals the slow grind down of monarchy as a system, as Thais contemplate — quietly for now — whether they even need a king at all. Read more

Ariel Sharon, Israel’s “Bulldozer” Premier, Dies

Israeli prime minister Menahem Begin speaks with Ariel Sharon, then the minister of agriculture, in his office in Jerusalem, August 9, 1977
Israeli prime minister Menahem Begin speaks with Ariel Sharon, then the minister of agriculture, in his office in Jerusalem, August 9, 1977 (GPO/Saar Yaacov)

In many aspects, Ariel Sharon was an inconsistent figure, unexpected and hard to analyze. The former Israeli prime minister, who died Saturday, will be remembered as a brave soldier and a sophisticated politician, a decisive builder but an efficient destroyer, hawkish but pragmatic, a brilliant strategist and a precise tactician, a devoted farmer and a true Zionist. In each of his endeavors, Sharon won considerable amounts of criticism, from both sides of the map, but the one word that best describes him is “bulldozer,” because whatever it was that Sharon set out to obtain, he couldn’t be stopped once he was after it. Read more

Margaret Thatcher, Britain’s “Iron Lady”, Dies

President George H.W. Bush greets Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of the United Kingdom at Camp David, Maryland, November 24, 1989
President George H.W. Bush greets Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of the United Kingdom at Camp David, Maryland, November 24, 1989 (White House)

Former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher died in London on Monday at the age of 87 after suffering a stroke.

The former Conservative Party leader’s sheer willpower and courage sustained her political ascendancy over male rivals. She was the first and so far only woman prime minister of the United Kingdom, the first to win three consecutive elections and the last successful wartime leader. Her premiership was the longest in British history since the early nineteenth century and the most formidable since Winston Churchill’s. She survived an assassination attempt by Irish republicans in 1984.

Known as “Thatcher the milk snatcher” among opponents due to her decision while education secretary to withdraw the provisions of free school milk for children aged seven to eleven, and earning the title of “Iron Lady” for her steadfast opposition to communism, no other British leader has been so decisive.

Thatcher inspired a generation of political leaders on both the left and the right to either fight what they saw as unfair policies or stand with her and carry on her legacy. Read more