Down in the Polls, Sanders Echoes Trump on Media Bias

Vermont senator Bernie Sanders gives a speech in Des Moines, Iowa, January 9, 2016
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders gives a speech in Des Moines, Iowa, January 9, 2016 (Gage Skidmore)

First, Bernie Sanders suggested the Democratic Party teamed up on him in 2016 to deny him the presidential nomination. (Of a party of which he is not even a member.)

Now he is suggesting The Washington Post is giving him unfavorable coverage because he has been critical of its owner, Jeff Bezos.

America already has one party that regularly calls the legitimacy of institutions like universities, the FBI and NATO into doubt. It doesn’t need Democrats to do the same. Read more

Sanders Should Stop Undermining Trust in the Democratic Party

Vermont senator Bernie Sanders makes a speech in Brooklyn, New York, April 8, 2016
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders makes a speech in Brooklyn, New York, April 8, 2016 (Timothy Krause)

Bernie Sanders is at it again, alleging that the 2016 Democratic primary was “rigged” against him.

It wasn’t, and Sanders should stop saying so. At a time when Donald Trump is calling the legitimacy of academia, science, the news media, the FBI, NATO and other multilateral organizations into question, the last thing the left needs to do is undermine trust in more institutions. Read more

Why It’s Fair Not to Treat Sanders Like the Democratic Frontrunner

Vermont senator Bernie Sanders takes part in a protest in Washington DC, November 17, 2016
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders takes part in a protest in Washington DC, November 17, 2016 (Lorie Shaull)

NBC’s political team asks if it is fair to treat Bernie Sanders as an insurgent rather than the legitimate frontrunner in the Democratic presidential primary, given his high name recognition and the fact that he has raised more money than the other candidates.

I think so. Read more

Updates from the Democratic Primary

Vermont senator Bernie Sanders makes a speech in Phoenix, Arizona, July 18, 2015
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders makes a speech in Phoenix, Arizona, July 18, 2015 (Gage Skidmore)
  • Bernie Sanders has made it official and is running for the Democratic nomination a second time.
  • New Jersey governor Phil Murphy has endorsed Cory Booker, the junior senator from his state.
  • Tim Walz, the governor of Minnesota, has endorsed his state’s Amy Klobuchar.
  • Kamala Harris has won the endorsement of Governor Gavin Newsom and a slew of California state legislators.
  • Klobuchar is not endorsing Medicare-for-all and free college education, positioning herself as a “straight-talking moderate“. Read more

Why Americans Can’t Have European-Style Health Care

Vermont senator Bernie Sanders takes part in a protest in Washington DC, November 17, 2016
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders takes part in a protest in Washington DC, November 17, 2016 (Lorie Shaull)

Sixteen Democratic senators, led by the 2016 presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders, have called for reforms that would make all Americans eligible for public health care.

Such a system — the Americans call it “single-payer” — would be uncontroversial in Europe, where most countries guarantee health care to their citizens.

But it seems impossible to get done in America. Why? Read more

Sanders Supporters Shouldn’t Sympathize with Corbyn

Labour's Jeremy Corbyn talks with reporters outside Parliament in London, England, June 11, 2008
Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn talks with reporters outside Parliament in London, England, June 11, 2008 (Flickr/Jasn)

As Americans try to make sense of what is happening in British politics, Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn is sometimes compared for convenience with Democratic Party candidate Bernie Sanders, another leftwinger.

There are similarities. Both are old men who appeal mostly to disillusioned Millennials. Both are to the left of their parties. And both are refusing to give up when it’s obvious to everyone else that they’ve lost.

But dig a little deeper and you’ll find significant differences that should give Bernie Sanders’ supporters pause. Read more

Sanders Does Not Do Better Against Trump Than Clinton

Vermont senator Bernie Sanders gives a speech in Des Moines, Iowa, January 9
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders gives a speech in Des Moines, Iowa, January 9 (Gage Skidmore)

Diehard Bernie Sanders supporters who refuse to acknowledge that the Vermont senator has lost the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination to Hillary Clinton have one last trick up their sleeves: convincing so-called superdelegates to override the will of the electorate and support him at the convention in July.

No matter that Sanders previously criticized superdelegates as an antidemocratic instrument to, well, override the will of the people.

The argument is that Sanders, a self-described socialist, is more electable against Donald Trump, the likely Republican candidate, hence the 700+ superdelegates — elected and party officials, many of whom have endorsed Clinton — ought to put him, not Clinton, over the top.

This argument rests on a misreading of the polls (assuming the polls are altogether useful five months away from an election). Read more