1. Abe’s Refusal to Shake Up Japan’s Labor Market Spells Decline

    Young Japanese can’t find the job security they need to start a family. Their government is doing nothing to help.

    When Prime Minister Shinzō Abe finally unveiled his plans to make Japan more competitive in June, the proposals underwhelmed. While he promised to lower Japan's corporate tax rate, currently the highest in the developed world, to below 30 percent, Abe shied…
  1. In South Korea, Xi Seen Distancing China from North Korea

    The Chinese president appears to see relations with his communist neighboring more dispassionately than his predecessors.

    Visiting South Korea on Thursday, China's president, Xi Jinping, appeared to distance himself from his country's longtime communist ally North Korea, telling his South Korean counterpart, Park Geun-hye, that China took an "impartial" view to situation on…
  1. Japan’s Abe Shies Away from Structural Economic Reforms

    The “third arrow” of the Japanese prime minster’s economic reform program underwhelms.

    Japan's prime minister, Shinzō Abe, finally unveiled the "third arrow" of his economic reform program on Tuesday but the measures hardly signified a decidedly more liberal policy. The conservative leader promised to lower Japan's corporate tax rate, currently the highest in…
  1. Chinese Aggression Could Be Informed by Domestic, Not Foreign Policy

    Aggressive Chinese movies in the East and South China Seas may not be part of a plan to push the Americans out of the region.

    China's revisionist maritime claims and aggressive policy toward its neighbors in Southeast Asia suggest the country's "peaceful rise" has come to an end. If that is the case, America's strategists would be wise to…
  1. Putin at Ease in Asia’s Power Politics

    The West’s desire to isolate Russia does not seem to resonate in Asia where powers’ interests trump liberal ideals.

    There is an expression in Japan: kumo o tsukamuyou. It translates roughly into "like grasping a cloud." We might call it "wishful thinking." The proverb springs to mind when reading Japan's former defense minister Yuriko Koike's…
  1. Thai Coup Leader Says Return to Democracy Will Take Year

    General Prayuth Chan-ocha says new elections can only be called after a period of reconciliation and reform under army rule.

    Thailand's army and coup leader General Prayuth Chan-ocha appealed for patience from the country's population and its allies in a speech late Friday night, saying the return to democracy would take about one year. Prayuth, who…
  1. Thai Army Stages Coup After Months of Political Unrest

    The military says it has to step in to restore order and push through necessary political reforms.

    Thailand's army took control of the government in a coup on Thursday, two days after declaring martial law. In a television statement, the country's army chief, General Prayuth Chan-ocha, said talks between rival political factions to…
  1. Thai Supreme Court Ousts Prime Minister Shinawatra

    Thailand’s Constitutional Court forces the divisive prime minister to resign, setting the stage for more political unrest.

    Yingluck Shinawatra's prime ministership abruptly ended on Wednesday when Thailand's Constitutional Court ordered her and several of her cabinet ministers to step down. The court ruled that it had been unconstitutional for her to replace her national security chief three years ago.…
  1. China, Vietnam Trade Blows Over South China Sea Oil Explorations

    China moves a deepwater drilling rig into disputed waters with Vietnam to search for oil.

    China's state media and Vietnam's Foreign Ministry traded harsh words this week. The exchange came after the Vietnamese issued a strong protest over Chinese plans to search for oil in a disputed area of the South China Sea. It would be the…