1. Russia’s Crimea Seizure Underscores NATO’s Traditional Role

    After two decades of navel gazing, it turns out NATO is still most useful for what it set out to do in the first place.

    Russia's annexation of Ukraine's Crimea should be a reminder that NATO is still most relevant for what it set out to do in the first place -- keep the Russians out of Europe.…
  1. Saudi Spy Chief, Architect of Kingdom’s Syria Policy, Replaced

    Prince Bandar bin Sultan is removed from his post as Saudi Arabia’s intelligence chief just two years after he was appointed.

    Saudi Arabian spy chief Prince Bandar bin Sultan was removed from his post, state media reported on Tuesday. According to the Saudi Press Agency, Bandar, who was appointed in 2012 mainly to oversee the kingdom's…
  1. Abdullah, Ghani Likely to Square Off in Second Afghan Vote

    Abdullah Abdullah and Ashraf Ghani look likely to enter a second round of voting in what has so far been a largely peaceful election.

    Nearly two weeks after more than seven million Afghans ventured to the polls to participate in the country's presidential election, the Afghan…
  1. Assad Hails “Turning Point” in War as Rebels Advance on Latakia

    While opposition fighters advance on his Alawite homeland, the Syrian leader nevertheless claims victory is within reach.

    Syrian president Bashar al-Assad said on Sunday that the civil war in his country was at a "turning point." At the same time, opposition fighters were advancing on his Alawite homeland in the northwest of Syria. Speaking at Damascus University, Assad "pointed out that there…
  1. Jeb Bush Replaces Chris Christie as Mainstream Republican Favorite

    With the New Jersey governor embroiled in a political scandal, the former president’s brother emerges as a contender for 2016.

    New Jersey governor Chris Christie's presidential prospects appear to have faded since he became involved in a political scandal. In his stead, Jeb Bush, the former governor or Florida, has…
  1. Chile, Peru Resolve Maritime Dispute, Land Borders Still Contentious

    The two Latin American countries resolve a maritime border dispute that has its origins in the nineteenth century War of the Pacific.

    Late last month, an agreement was finally reached between Chile and Peru on a maritime border dispute that dated back to 1985. This followed a ruling by the International Court of Justice in The Hague which gave Peru over…
  1. Ukraine Separatists Reject Amnesty Offer, Demand Referendum

    Pro-Russian activists in the east of Ukraine refuse to back down unless the government in Kiev agrees to call a referendum.

    Pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine rejected an offer of amnesty from the government in Kiev on Tuesday, raising fears of an armed confrontation that could, in turn, prompt Russia to intervene. Earlier this week, activists in Luhansk, a city close to…
  1. Crimea Annexation Could Kill Russia’s South Stream Pipeline

    The Black Sea pipeline could fall victim to European countries’ efforts to reduce their dependence on Russian gas.

    Russia's invasion and annexation of the Crimea last month could have repercussions for its plans to lay a pipeline on the bottom of the Black Sea. Britain's The Telegraph newspaper reports that the European Commission has warned Bulgaria not to intervene if it decides to block the project. Bulgarian foreign minister…
  1. Chile’s Bachelet Pushes Ambitious Social Reform Agenda

    To satisfy Chileans’ desire for change, President Michelle Bachelet has already announced numerous reform policies.

    Since her inauguration ceremony last month, Chile's president, Michelle Bachelet, has announced a series of policies aimed at proving to the public her desire for change. Bachelet's election campaign was based on an ambitious social reform agenda, focused on issues such…