Spain Should Seize Opportunity of More Liberal Government

Albert Rivera, leader of the Spanish Citizens party, poses for a photo in Madrid, August 6, 2013
Albert Rivera, leader of the Spanish Citizens party, poses for a photo in Madrid, August 6, 2013 (Ciudadanos/Jordi Esteban)

Polls suggest no party will win an outright majority in Spain’s election this weekend. For the first time since democracy was restored, the country may need a coalition government.

Provided it’s one between Mariano Rajoy’s conservatives and the liberal Ciudadanos (“Citizens”), we think Spain should welcome the prospect.

A political duopoly is unhealthy. For more than thirty years, Rajoy’s People’s Party and the Socialists have alternated in power. Corruption and nepotism, while not at Greek or Latin American levels, are too common. When it comes to economic and social policy, the two main parties, for all their campaign rhetoric, really aren’t that far apart. Read more “Spain Should Seize Opportunity of More Liberal Government”

Five More Years: British Should Reelect Cameron, Clegg

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom deliver a news conference at 10 Downing Street, London, December 21, 2010
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom deliver a news conference at 10 Downing Street, London, December 21, 2010 (The Prime Minister’s Office)

With Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservatives expected to once again fall short of a parliamentary majority in the election this week, this website is hoping the Liberal Democrats will scrape together enough seats to keep the two parties in power. The last five years of coalition government have been stable and successful. The alternative, a Labour government held to ransom by Scottish separatists, would be anything but. Read more “Five More Years: British Should Reelect Cameron, Clegg”

Swedes Ought to Reelect Reinfeldt

Prime Minister John Fredrik Reinfeldt of Sweden arrives for a European Council meeting in Brussels, February 8, 2013
Prime Minister John Fredrik Reinfeldt of Sweden arrives for a European Council meeting in Brussels, February 8, 2013 (European Council)

John Fredrik Reinfeldt’s government in Sweden looks certain to lose an election on Sunday. That is unfortunate. His government, in office since 2006, has done much to transform the Nordic country.

Once hamstrung by outdated economic and social policies, Sweden is now among the most competitive and dynamic countries in Europe — due in no small part to Reinfeldt’s program. Read more “Swedes Ought to Reelect Reinfeldt”

Narendra Modi: The Man to Lead India into Growth

After a decade in power, India’s Congress party appears to have lost both the ability and the will to push through the reforms the country needs to grow and provide jobs for the millions of young Indians who are joining the labor market each year.

The only alternative in the elections that start on Monday is Narendra Modi, the conservative Bharatiya Janata Party’s prime ministerial candidate. Read more “Narendra Modi: The Man to Lead India into Growth”

In German Election, Merkel Is the Safest Choice

German chancellor Angela Merkel listens to a debate in parliament in Berlin, June 27
German chancellor Angela Merkel listens to a debate in parliament in Berlin, June 27 (Bundesregierung/Guido Bergmann)

Polls predict that German chancellor Angela Merkel will cruise to a comfortable victory in this week’s parliamentary elections. We would welcome her reelection.

Although the liberal Free Democrats, who emphasize economic freedom and individual responsibility, are more aligned with the Atlantic Sentinel‘s views, their leader, economy minister Philipp Rösler, looks unfit for the chancellorship. Merkel, by contrast, has proven herself to be a wise leader since she first assumed office in 2005 — sometimes pragmatic, otherwise steadfast. Read more “In German Election, Merkel Is the Safest Choice”

The World Is Waiting for President Huntsman

Former Utah governor and Republican Party presidential hopeful Jon Huntsman listens to a question from a voter in New Hampshire, November 12, 2011
Former Utah governor and Republican Party presidential hopeful Jon Huntsman listens to a question from a voter in New Hampshire, November 12, 2011 (Luke N. Vargas)

Among the Republicans contesting their party’s presidential nomination this year, there is only one man whom the world would definitely prefer over Barack Obama.

The world may be a bystander in America’s presidential election, but it watches carefully. Americans in November elect the most powerful man on the planet and conservative primary voters, starting this January, may be choosing that man.

Although we recognize that their economic predicament takes precedence over questions of foreign and trade policy, in today’s global society, where the collapse of a single American investment bank can bring down the whole of the developed world’s economy, the three are in fact intertwined.

So we have a stake in the matter. Especially at a time of economic calamity, Americans need a president who recognizes that access and openness to investment and trade is of paramount importance. There can be no recovery, in America or elsewhere, if nations slide into protectionism; if “Made in America” is not an emblem of pride and of quality but a harbinger of nationalist revival and an attempt to reverse the trend of globalization.

One nation’s growth cannot come at the expense of another. Nor can there be an industrial renaissance in the United States if it cannot afford anymore to champion freedom and opportunity abroad. Read more “The World Is Waiting for President Huntsman”