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Labour Leadership Election News

Rebecca Long-Bailey, Lisa Nandy and Keir Starmer qualify for the third round. Jeff Phillips pulls out.

Nick Ottens

Written by

Nick Ottens
Keir Starmer Jeremy Corbyn Rebecca Long-Bailey
British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn chairs a meeting in London flanked by Keir Starmer and Rebecca Long-Bailey, April 3, 2019 (PA/Stefan Rousseau)
  • Rebecca Long-Bailey, Lisa Nandy and Keir Starmer have won enough nominations from Labour Party affiliates to qualify for the third and final voting round in the contest to succeed Jeremy Corbyn.
  • Emily Thornberry is still short.
  • Jeff Phillips has withdrawn, saying she is not the candidate to unite Labour, and endorsed Nandy.
  • Len McCluskey, the Unite union boss who backs Long-Bailey, has responded to suggestions that centrist lawmakers might quit if the Corbyn loyalist prevails: “Good riddance.”

Nominations

Candidates need nominations from either 33 local parties, representing 5 percent of parliamentary constituencies, or three affiliates, of which two must be unions, representing at least 5 percent of the affiliate membership, to qualify for the final voting round by members and registered supporters.

In the first round, candidates needed the support of 10 percent of fellow lawmakers.

Only Starmer has enough local party support with nominations from 57 out of 647 constituencies.

In addition, he, Long-Bailey and Nandy have been endorsed by at least three affiliates each:

  • Long-Bailey by Unite, Britain’s second largest, and most left-wing, trade union; the Bakers, Food and Allied Workers’ Union and the Fire Brigades Union
  • Starmer by Unison, Britain’s largest trade union; the Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers, the Community trade union, the environmental group SERA and the Labour Movement for Europe.
  • Nandy by GMB, the third largest trade union; the National Union of Mineworkers and the socialist society Chinese for Labour.

Long-Bailey also has the support of the pro-Corbyn pressure group Momentum, but it does not have an institutional vote. Its roughly 40,000 members, however, will be a force in the third voting round.

The polls

  • Starmer leads with 46 to 32 percent support for Long-Bailey, according to YouGov. In the runoff, Starmer would defeat Long-Bailey with 63 to 37 percent.
  • Long-Bailey places first in a survey (PDF) by LabourList, but they only polled their own readers, who are more likely to be Corbyn supporters.

What’s next?

  • February 14: Deadline for constituency parties and affiliates to make nominations.
  • February 21-April 2: Party members, affiliate members and registered supporters vote by mail.
  • April 4: Winner announced.

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