The Price of Withdrawal from Afghanistan

An American soldier patrols the mountains of Bakwa, Farah Province, Afghanistan, February 25, 2010
An American soldier patrols the mountains of Bakwa, Farah Province, Afghanistan, February 25, 2010 (USAF/Staff Sergeant Nicholas Pilch)

On September 10, 2001, Afghanistan was at best a distant memory to many Americans as the land where the Soviet Union’s Red Army had faced its “Vietnam War.” While many Americans are much more familiar with the country after twelve years of armed conflict, the people of Afghanistan had been suffering the effects of war long before the United States invaded. Aside from dwindling American news coverage of the region, the progress of the quality of life for the Afghan people continues to be impaired by the growing pains of a government in transition.

Often forgotten in the regales of military heroism and occasional fits of blind nationalism is the silent plight of Afghan women. It would be easy to assume that the perpetual kinetic violence of protracted combat would be the most difficult issue to overcome for Afghanistan but that is not the case. Education, communication and greater connectivity with the outside world remain the only true solutions to the issues that face Afghanistan. Read more “The Price of Withdrawal from Afghanistan”