Shock of EU Exit Reverberates Through British Politics

British parliament London
Aerial view of the Palace of Westminster in London, England (iStock/Robert Ingelhart)
  • Britain’s Conservative Party is looking for a new leader. David Cameron announced his resignation after losing the EU referendum.
  • Home Secretary Theresa May is seen as the strongest contender.
  • The opposition Labour Party is in revolt against its leader, Jeremy Corbyn. There are rumors of a split.
  • Gibraltar and Scotland are in talks to try and find a way to stay in the EU. Read more “Shock of EU Exit Reverberates Through British Politics”

British Vote to Leave EU Roils Western World

British prime minister David Cameron and French president François Hollande pay their respects at the First World War memorial in Pozières, March 3
British prime minister David Cameron and French president François Hollande pay their respects at the First World War memorial in Pozières, March 3 (The Prime Minister’s Office/Georgina Coupe)
  • Britain shocked its allies on Thursday, when it voted 52 to 48 percent in a referendum to leave the European Union.
  • The remaining 27 member states want Britain to make haste, but Prime Minister David Cameron has said he will not trigger Britain’s exit at next week’s European Council.
  • Britain’s departure is a diplomatic disaster for France, Europe’s only other nuclear power. Read more “British Vote to Leave EU Roils Western World”

Britain Votes to Leave EU: The Day After

Parliament London England
View of the Houses of Parliament in London, England, December 21, 2011 (Ben Sutherland)
  • The United Kingdom has voted 52 to 48 percent in a referendum to leave the European Union. The difference is more than one million votes.
  • England and Wales strongly supported Brexit while Scotland and Northern Ireland largely voted to remain, raising the specter of further constitutional upheaval.
  • London and other metropolitan areas voted to stay in, revealing a deep split in British society. Read more “Britain Votes to Leave EU: The Day After”

A Liberal, Realistic European Union Needs Britain

Flags of the United Kingdom and the European Union outside the Berlaymont building in Brussels, January 29
Flags of the United Kingdom and the European Union outside the Berlaymont building in Brussels, January 29 (European Commission)

France and Poland team up to block a trade pact with South America, fearing cheap agricultural imports. Opposition to a trade agreement with the United States grows in Germany and Italy, possibly dooming the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. Countries in Central Europe feel squeezed in between their former occupier Russia and an accommodating Germany.

It’s as though the last few weeks have been a preview of what the European Union might look like without the United Kingdom.

The British vote in a referendum next week whether to stay in the EU or leave. We hope a majority will vote “remain”, which is the better option for everyone. Read more “A Liberal, Realistic European Union Needs Britain”

Second Super Tuesday Blog

  • Six presidential primaries are held across the United States on what the news media have dubbed the second “Super Tuesday”.
  • These primaries are a chance for former secretary of state Hillary Clinton to prove she can win outside the South, where nonwhite voters have dominated the Democratic contests. Her socialist rival, Bernie Sanders, has done better in Northern industrial states. Watch Ohio.
  • For the Republicans, it’s the last chance to slow down businessman Donald Trump. If he does poorly today, he is likely to fall short of a delegate majority. But if Trump wins, it is going to be almost impossible to take the nomination away from him. Crucial will be Florida and Ohio, the home states of Trump’s rivals Marco Rubio and John Kasich. Read more “Second Super Tuesday Blog”

Super Tuesday Blog

  • Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton has won the Democratic nominating contests in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. Her socialist rival, Bernie Sanders, has won his home state of Vermont as well as Colorado, Minnesota and Oklahoma.
  • Counting “super delegates” (party officials with a vote at the convention), Clinton now has 1,001 out of 2,383 delegates needed to win. Sanders has 371.
  • On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump has won the contests in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee and Virginia. He has 316 out of 1,237 delegates he needs for the nomination. Senator Ted Cruz is in second place with 226 delegates after winning his home state of Texas as well as Alaska and Oklahoma. Read more “Super Tuesday Blog”

Spain Should Seize Opportunity of More Liberal Government

Albert Rivera, leader of the Spanish Citizens party, poses for a photo in Madrid, August 6, 2013
Albert Rivera, leader of the Spanish Citizens party, poses for a photo in Madrid, August 6, 2013 (Ciudadanos/Jordi Esteban)

Polls suggest no party will win an outright majority in Spain’s election this weekend. For the first time since democracy was restored, the country may need a coalition government.

Provided it’s one between Mariano Rajoy’s conservatives and the liberal Ciudadanos (“Citizens”), we think Spain should welcome the prospect.

A political duopoly is unhealthy. For more than thirty years, Rajoy’s People’s Party and the Socialists have alternated in power. Corruption and nepotism, while not at Greek or Latin American levels, are too common. When it comes to economic and social policy, the two main parties, for all their campaign rhetoric, really aren’t that far apart. Read more “Spain Should Seize Opportunity of More Liberal Government”

Five More Years: British Should Reelect Cameron, Clegg

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom deliver a news conference at 10 Downing Street, London, December 21, 2010
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom deliver a news conference at 10 Downing Street, London, December 21, 2010 (The Prime Minister’s Office)

With Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservatives expected to once again fall short of a parliamentary majority in the election this week, this website is hoping the Liberal Democrats will scrape together enough seats to keep the two parties in power. The last five years of coalition government have been stable and successful. The alternative, a Labour government held to ransom by Scottish separatists, would be anything but. Read more “Five More Years: British Should Reelect Cameron, Clegg”