Democrats, Republicans Could Change Places

The United States Capitol in Washington DC
The United States Capitol in Washington DC (Shutterstock/Orhan Cam)

This year’s presidential election in the United States could realign its politics along the same lines we’re seeing in Europe, writes Michael Lind in Politico: between cosmopolitan, liberal internationalists on the left and nationalist, socially conservative isolationists on the right.

The prospect of a Clinton-Trump contest is something of a vindication for Lind, who argued in 2014 already that American politics were shaping up this way.

As Lind sees it, the Republican Party is now predominantly a Midwestern, white, working-class one with its geographic epicenter in the South and interior West. Country-and-western Republicans have gradually replaced country-club Republicans. As a result, the gap between the party’s economic orthodoxy and the economic interests of its voters has widened.

Lee Drutman has argued at Vox that there is something of a parallel division on the left, between a pro-corporate, socially liberal faction represented by Hillary Clinton and a far-left, antibusiness wing that is now rallying around Bernie Sanders.

What has kept those constituencies in both parties together, according to Lind, is identity politics. Read more “Democrats, Republicans Could Change Places”

Realignment Less Likely Than Republican Split

Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump and Ted Cruz take part in a debate televised by ABC News from Goffstown, New Hampshire, February 6
Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump and Ted Cruz take part in a debate televised by ABC News from Goffstown, New Hampshire, February 6 (ABC/Ida Mae Astute)

Donald Trump’s seemingly unstoppable march to the Republican Party’s presidential nomination could be the harbinger of a political realignment in the United States.

Lee Drutman argues at Vox that the Republicans are split between a growing nationalist-populist wing and a pragmatic, pro-business wing. The latter is often called the “establishment” and has prevailed in every presidential contest since Barry Goldwater won the nomination in 1964.

This year could be its undoing. Read more “Realignment Less Likely Than Republican Split”