Separatists Defend Majority in Catalan Election

Catalan party leaders Inés Arrimadas and Carles Puigdemont
Catalan party leaders Inés Arrimadas and Carles Puigdemont (Ciutadans/Generalitat de Catalunya)
  • Separatists defended their majority in Catalonia on Thursday.
  • Parties that want to secede from Spain won seventy out of 135 seats in the regional parliament against 57 for the unionists. Read more

What You Need to Know About the Republican Tax Plan

View of the United States Capitol at dusk, December 8, 2011
View of the United States Capitol at dusk, December 8, 2011 (Architect of the Capitol)

Republicans in the United States have enacted the final version of their tax plan.

The reforms cut corporate and income tax by a magnitude of $1.5 trillion, with the biggest gains going to the highest incomes.

Included is a repeal of the individual mandate from Obamacare, which could throw millions of Americans off health insurance.

Here are the most important things you need to know about the changes. Read more

Macron Bounces Back in Polls. Does It Matter?

French president Emmanuel Macron chats with a guard at the Elysée Palace in Paris, December 19
French president Emmanuel Macron chats with a guard at the Elysée Palace in Paris, December 19 (Elysée/Ghislain Mariette)

When French president Emmanuel Macron’s popularity was down earlier this year, I cautioned against reading too much into it.

Macron has four years left until he must face voters again. His party has a comfortable majority in the National Assembly and he enjoys the support of both businesses and the largest trade unions for economic reforms.

Now that his approval rating is up — from around 30 percent, which corresponds with the support he got in the first presidential voting round, to over 50 percent — I can hardly argue it is more significant. Read more

Our Catalan Election Day Live Blog and Reading List

View of the Palau Nacional in Barcelona, Spain, March 17, 2011
View of the Palau Nacional in Barcelona, Spain, March 17, 2011 (Mark Turner)

On Thursday, the Atlantic Sentinel will be providing live analysis and commentary of the election in Catalonia.

In addition to updating you on the results, our focus will be on analysis and opinion. We’ll be reading the local, European and international coverage of the election and share (and where necessary translate) interesting takes for you.

I hope you’ll join us! We’ll kick off around noon Central European Time. Read more

Young Italians Blame EU, But Their Problems Are Homegrown

View of the Piazza del Duomo in Milan, Italy, November 24, 2009
View of the Piazza del Duomo in Milan, Italy, November 24, 2009 (Bjørn Giesenbauer)

In most European countries, young people are more supportive of the EU than their elders.

In Italy, Politico reports, the trend is reversed.

If a referendum on EU membership were held, one in two Italians under the age of 45 would vote to leave. Only a quarter of those over 45 would do the same.

Younger voters’ unhappiness with the EU came from a sense that what’s good for the bloc comes at Italy’s expense. Strong majorities among the young said that the migrant crisis showed the EU could not be counted on to help Italy with its biggest challenges.

Hence support for the Euroskeptic Five Star Movement and Northern League, which are polling at a combined 40 percent. Read more

How and Why Americans Switch Parties

Visitors at the de Young museum in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, California, October 16, 2005
Visitors at the de Young museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, California, October 16, 2005 (Thomas Hawk)

13 percent of Americans switched parties in the last five years. Economic anxiety had little to do with Democrats changing sides to support Donald Trump.

Those are some of the more surprising findings of the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group. Read more

Why Millennials Are More Sympathetic to Big Government

Voters listen to a speech by Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine in Davidson, North Carolina, October 12, 2016
Voters listen to a speech by Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine in Davidson, North Carolina, October 12, 2016 (Hillary for America/Alyssa S.)

Polls show that Americans under the age of 35 are more sympathetic to big government than their elders. Democrats have a 48-point advantage among millennial voters, according to the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey.

That is not so surprising when you realize that their generation may be the first in a long time that is worse off than their parents’.

Michael Hobbes’ feature about millennials in The Huffington Post contains some sobering statistics.

On average, he writes, Americans under the age of 35:

  • Have 300 percent more student debt than their parents;
  • Are half as likely to own homes as young people were in the 1970s; and
  • Will probably have to work until they’re 75.

The stereotype of the overqualified liberal arts graduate working as a barista is only half-correct. Many young Americans are struggling to find high-paying jobs despite having spent tens — sometimes hundreds — of thousands of dollars on their education. Less known is that one in five young adults live in poverty. Read more