Liberal Free Democrats Would Keep Merkel Sharp

Christian Lindner, leader of Germany's Free Democratic Party, gives an interview in Berlin, June 26
Christian Lindner, leader of Germany’s Free Democratic Party, gives an interview in Berlin, June 26 (INSM)

There is little doubt Angela Merkel will win reelection in Germany on Sunday. Her Christian Democrats are projected to win up to 40 percent support against 25 percent for the second party, the Social Democrats.

The two could continue to share power in a “grand coalition”, but we’re hoping the liberal Free Democrats will win enough seats to help form a center-right government instead.

Polls suggest that the two parties might just fall short of a majority. Conservative and liberal voters who want to keep the left out of power ought to give the Free Democrats their support. Read more

Liberal Democrats Are the Least Bad Option in Britain’s Election

British Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron
British Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron (Shutterstock/Finbarr Webster)

This British election is an impossible choice for liberals like us.

We can’t possibly support Jeremy Corbyn, whose policies of nationalization and unilateral nuclear disarmament would compound the disaster of Brexit — which he did far too little to prevent — many times over.

But we are not impressed with Theresa May either. She was the best possible candidate to succeed David Cameron last summer, but only because the alternatives were worse. Many British voters could make the same calculation this week. Read more

Elect Macron to Move France Forward

Former French economy minister Emmanuel Macron speaks with farmers in Châlons-en-Champagne, September 1, 2016
Former French economy minister Emmanuel Macron speaks with farmers in Châlons-en-Champagne, September 1, 2016 (Facebook)

For once, the French are spoilt for choice.

Their presidential elections used to be a battle for the center between the mainstream left and the mainstream right. Now there are five candidates with a reasonable chance of qualifying for the second voting round in May, including a big-government socialist, a small-government conservative, a nationalist of the left and a nationalist of the right.

Our sympathies lie with the fifth man in the middle: Emmanuel Macron. Comfortable with neither the statist inclinations of the Socialist Party nor the social conservatism of the Republicans, he launched his own progressive movement last year for the rejuvenation of France. It represents the best alternative to the anti-globalism of Jean-Luc Mélenchon and Marine Le Pen. Read more

Hillary Clinton Is the Only Serious Candidate in This Election

Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton campaigns in Nevada, February 15
Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton campaigns in Nevada, February 15 (Hillary for America/Samuel Fisch)

Four years ago, the Atlantic Sentinel was split on whether to endorse Barack Obama or Mitt Romney for president. We share the Democrats’ social liberalism and respected the president’s foreign policy but were also drawn to the Republican’s energy and fiscal policies.

This year, it’s no contest at all. Donald Trump, the Republican candidate, is totally unfit for the office he seeks.

Many publications have in their endorsements made the case against Trump. We won’t do that again. We have reported on Trump’s fascist tendencies, his admiration for strongmen, his misguided foreign policy, his racism, his poor administrative skills and how he undermines the public’s trust in institutions. There is no need to go over that again. If, after all this time, you’re still determined to vote for Trump, we don’t know what else we could write to change your mind.

Instead, we want to speak to those voters who are still undecided or are thinking about voting for a third-party candidate by making a positive case for supporting Hillary Clinton, the Democrat.

She is not without her flaws. Clinton can be secretive and she is slow to admit mistakes. Many Clinton “scandals” are blown out of proportion by zealous conservatives, but somebody who has been in politics for more than thirty years is also bound to have some skeletons in her closet.

Nevertheless, we believe Clinton’s qualities outweigh her shortcomings and that she is worth your vote. Read more

A Liberal, Realistic European Union Needs Britain

A polling station sign is seen through a European Union flag in London, England, March 21
A polling station sign is seen through a European Union flag in London, England, March 21 (Descrier)

France and Poland team up to block a trade pact with South America, fearing cheap agricultural imports. Opposition to a trade agreement with the United States grows in Germany and Italy, possibly dooming the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. Countries in Central Europe feel squeezed in between their former occupier Russia and an accommodating Germany.

It’s as though the last few weeks have been a preview of what the European Union might look like without the United Kingdom.

The British vote in a referendum next week whether to stay in the EU or leave. We hope a majority will vote “remain”, which is the better option for everyone. Read more

Spain Should Seize Opportunity of More Liberal Government

Albert Rivera, leader of the Spanish Ciudadanos party, poses for a photo in Madrid, August 6, 2013
Albert Rivera, leader of the Spanish Ciudadanos party, poses for a photo in Madrid, August 6, 2013 (Ciudadanos /Jordi Esteban)

Polls suggest no party will win an outright majority in Spain’s election this weekend. For the first time since democracy was restored, the country may need a coalition government.

Provided it’s one between Mariano Rajoy’s conservatives and the liberal Ciudadanos (“Citizens”), we think Spain should welcome the prospect.

A political duopoly is unhealthy. For more than thirty years, Rajoy’s People’s Party and the Socialists have alternated in power. Corruption and nepotism, while not at Greek or Latin American levels, are too common. When it comes to economic and social policy, the two main parties, for all their campaign rhetoric, really aren’t that far apart. Read more

Five More Years: British Should Reelect Cameron, Clegg

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom deliver a news conference at 10 Downing Street, London, December 21, 2010
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom deliver a news conference at 10 Downing Street, London, December 21, 2010 (The Prime Minister’s Office)

With Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservatives expected to once again fall short of a parliamentary majority in the election this week, this website is hoping the Liberal Democrats will scrape together enough seats to keep the two parties in power. The last five years of coalition government have been stable and successful. The alternative, a Labour government held to ransom by Scottish separatists, would be anything but. Read more