Trump Defeats Clinton in Unexpectedly Close Election

American presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
American presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton (Gage Skidmore/Hillary for America/Barbara Kinney)
  • Americans have chosen businessman Donald Trump to succeed Barack Obama as president. Democrat Hillary Clinton lost the election by falling short in key states, including Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and North Carolina.
  • Republicans also defended their majorities in Congress. They are projected to win 236 seats in the House of Representatives, where 218 are needed for a majority, and 51 seats in the Senate. Read more

Electoral College Projections Favor Clinton

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton prepares to give a speech in Detroit, Michigan, November 4
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton prepares to give a speech in Detroit, Michigan, November 4 (Hillary for America/Barbara Kinney)

Hillary Clinton can afford to lose several of the states that are leaning her way and still prevail in America’s presidential election on Tuesday.

By contrast, her rival, Donald Trump, must triumph in all states that have voted Republican in recent elections and then some.

Barring an upset, the first results from the East Coast should tell us if Clinton is indeed likely to succeed Barack Obama in January. Read more

Trump Closes In, But Clinton Has Four Structural Advantages

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a campaign event in Pueblo, Colorado, October 12
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a campaign event in Pueblo, Colorado, October 12 (Hillary for America/Barbara Kinney)

The week before election day is always nerve-wracking, this year’s near-apocalyptic feel notwithstanding.

So perhaps it’s fate that in the most contested election in decades, the gap between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is narrowing.

According to FiveThirtyEight, the Democrat enjoyed a 6.8-percent lead in the popular vote projection on October 18. As of November 2, it’s a 3.5-percent lead. The race is tightening. Read more

Clinton’s Emails Crowd Out Trump Scandals for No Good Reason

American secretary of state Hillary Clinton attends a news conference in Washington DC, June 14, 2012
American secretary of state Hillary Clinton attends a news conference in Washington DC, June 14, 2012 (DoD/Glenn Fawcett)

I thought we were done with this, but it’s one week out from the election and Hillary Clinton’s emails are a thing again.

We still don’t know why exactly. In a letter to Congress on Friday that resurrected the issue, James Comey, the FBI director, wrote that more emails that “appear to be pertinent to the investigation” had been recovered.

We have since learned that those emails were recovered from the laptop of former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner, who is under investigation for allegedly sexting a minor and whose estranged wife, Huma Abedin, is a top Clinton campaign staffer.

Comey told Congress the FBI could not yet assess if the emails found on Weiner’s computer were relevant to its investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of state; an investigation that was closed earlier this year after the FBI found she had done nothing illegal.

So what was the point of informing Congress? Read more

Hillary Clinton Is the Only Serious Candidate in This Election

Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton campaigns in Nevada, February 15
Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton campaigns in Nevada, February 15 (Hillary for America/Samuel Fisch)

Four years ago, the Atlantic Sentinel was split on whether to endorse Barack Obama or Mitt Romney for president. We share the Democrats’ social liberalism and respected the president’s foreign policy, but we were drawn to the Republican’s energy and fiscal policies.

This year, it’s no contest at all. Donald Trump, the Republican candidate, is totally unfit for the office he seeks. Read more

Your Third-Party Statement Is Not Worth Trump

Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton prepares to give a speech in Raleigh, North Carolina, September 27
Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton prepares to give a speech in Raleigh, North Carolina, September 27 (Hillary for America/Barbara Kinney)

Voting is an exercise in compromise: Any winner has to get the most votes — i.e., the “first past the post” system. I may believe my old professor, my local police captain, my boss or my well-read uncle would make the best officeholder in any particular election. But writing them in would be useless, since no one gets into office on the strength of one vote.

First past the post means that in the majority of American elections, only two candidates stand a plausible chance of winning: the Democrat and the Republican.

Does this limit our options? Of course. But a better system doesn’t (yet) exist, which means that when you vote for a third party, you abdicate your right to affect the outcome.

Third parties will tell you that viability isn’t the point. Voting for them sends an unfiltered, uncompromised message that your views are not represented by Democrats or Republicans. Instinctively, that makes sense. Who’s to tell you to vote against your conscience? And if both candidates are equally objectionable, is there harm done if withholding your support from one helps elect the other? Read more

Clinton-Trump Debates Unlikely to Change Many Voters’ Minds

Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton makes a speech in New York City, New York, February 16
Former American secretary of state Hillary Clinton makes a speech in New York City, New York, February 16 (Hillary for America/Michael Davidson)

Saturday will see Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump face off in the first of three planned televised debates between the presidential candidates.

James Fallows, in a preview of the debates for The Atlantic, argues they are “must-watch TV” because they will see the most extreme contrast of personal, intellectual and political styles in American democratic history: “Right brain versus left brain; gut versus any portion of the brain at all; impulse versus calculation; id versus superego; and of course man versus woman.”

No doubt, with Trump’s penchant for spectacle, the debates will be watched by many — tens, maybe hundreds of millions around the world.

But will they matter? Read more