1. British Housing Shortage Requires Concerted National Effort

    Until there is a significant chance in British policy, the dream of owning a property will remain just that — a dream.

    In the past, revolt and unrest in Britain were typically sparked by the cost of bread and corn. Today, it is the price of housing. This month, the average price of a home in London reached £500,000. The average housing price…
  1. British Party Leaders Speak to Core Voters at Conferences

    The Conservative and Labour conferences were similar in that both aimed at shoring up traditional party bases.

    The Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham that ended on Wednesday was, in many ways, remarkably similar to Labour's conference in Manchester a week earlier. Both British party leaders -- the Conservative prime minister David Cameron and Labour's Ed…
  1. Conservative Party Defections Cast Cloud Over Conference

    Rather than worry about the upcoming election, Conservatives wonder who will be next to head over to UKIP.

    Today marks the start of the British Conservative Party's final conference before the general election in May. The affair was meant to be a large one this year, with several new policy announcements concerning, among other things, the growing…
  1. As Scottish Referendum Nears, Tempers Heat Up

    With Scotland divided on the issue of independence, the rhetoric on both sides of the debate is heating up.

    With Scotland's referendum on whether or not to secede from the United Kingdom under two weeks away, the rhetoric from both sides of debate has become fierce. One Scottish women, a nationalist, recently accused Alistair Darling, the former Labour chancellor who leads the "Better…
  1. Rising Rail Fares Boost Support for Renationalization in Britain

    Rising fares and rail ownership by foreign companies fuels British support for renationalization.

    This week, it was announced that rail fares in the United Kingdom will rise 3.5 percent -- more than double the rate of consumer price inflation and six times as fast as the growth in wages. This has led to some head…
  1. More Powerful Mayors Could Mend England’s “Democratic Deficit”

    Calls for a separate English legislature could be staved off if mayors were given the same powers as London’s Boris Johnson

    With the Scottish referendum on independence drawing closer, the one certain thing is that no matter how the region votes, British or English politics will be irreversibly changed. The history of tension between England and the parliament in…
  1. Britain’s Economic Recovery Boost for Ruling Conservative Party

    As unemployment continues to fall, more voters trust the Conservatives on the economy than Labour.

    Britain's economy has begun to grow at its fastest rate since 2007. Last year, according to the Office for National Statistics, economic growth was 1.9 percent. Unemployment is down to 7.1 percent. Almost a record number of Britons is now in work. Adding to this is sign that the…
  1. British Manufacturing Expected to See Renaissance

    Companies repatriate manufacturing jobs as demand for British made products rises and Asia loses its cheap labor edge.

    British manufacturing is "booming again." Orders and output have been rising at their fastest peace in nearly twenty years and this headline figure is just the latest good news for the island nation. The death of British manufacturing may have been exaggerated to…
  1. Britain’s Conservative Party Could Win Trade Union Support

    Trade union members are not as hostile to right wing policy proposals as is commonly assumed.

    When Margaret Thatcher won the 1979 election, she was helped into Downing Street by what many of today's politicians would regard as an unlikely group of Tory voters. The votes of trade unionists were crucial to Thatcher beating Jim Callaghan that year. Yet she was not…