Merkel Wins Reelection in Germany, But Will Need More Parties to Govern

German party leaders Angela Merkel and Martin Schulz
German party leaders Angela Merkel and Martin Schulz (EPP/Bayern SPD)
  • Germany could see a three-party “Jamaica” coalition after its election on Sunday.
  • Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats lost support but are still the largest party.
  • The Social Democrats suffered an historic defeat and have ruled out a continuation of the left-right “grand coalition”. Read more

Liberal Free Democrats Would Keep Merkel Sharp

Christian Lindner, leader of Germany's Free Democratic Party, gives an interview in Berlin, June 26
Christian Lindner, leader of Germany’s Free Democratic Party, gives an interview in Berlin, June 26 (INSM)

There is little doubt Angela Merkel will win reelection in Germany on Sunday. Her Christian Democrats are projected to win up to 40 percent support against 25 percent for the second party, the Social Democrats.

The two could continue to share power in a “grand coalition”, but we’re hoping the liberal Free Democrats will win enough seats to help form a center-right government instead.

Polls suggest that the two parties might just fall short of a majority. Conservative and liberal voters who want to keep the left out of power ought to give the Free Democrats their support. Read more

Catalonia Independence Referendum News and Opinion Blog

Mariano Rajoy, the prime minister of Spain, and Carles Puigdemont, the president of Catalonia
Mariano Rajoy, the prime minister of Spain, and Carles Puigdemont, the president of Catalonia (La Moncloa/Ariet/Generalitat de Catalunya)
  • Spain claims control of Catalonia’s public finances and police force in an effort to stop the independence referendum planned for October 1.
  • Regional president Carles Puigdemont says Spain has “crossed a red line.” Read more

May to Stay in Power with Support of North Ireland Unionists

British prime minister Theresa May speaks with the American secretary of defense, James Mattis, at Lancaster House in London, England, May 11
British prime minister Theresa May speaks with the American secretary of defense, James Mattis, at Lancaster House in London, England, May 11 (DoD/Jette Carr)
  • Britain’s ruling Conservatives have lost their majority in Parliament, going down from 329 to 318 seats.
  • But they should be able to govern with support from the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland, which has ten seats. Read more

Conservatives Lose Majority in British Election

British party leaders Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May
British party leaders Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May (PES/DoD/Jette Carr)
  • Elections were held in the United Kingdom on Thursday.
  • The ruling Conservatives have lost their majority but remain the largest party with 317 out of 650 seats in the House of Commons. They could probably count on the support of unionists from Northern Ireland to form a majority government. Read more

Liberal Democrats Are the Least Bad Option in Britain’s Election

British Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron
British Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron (Shutterstock/Finbarr Webster)

This British election is an impossible choice for liberals like us.

We can’t possibly support Jeremy Corbyn, whose policies of nationalization and unilateral nuclear disarmament would compound the disaster of Brexit — which he did far too little to prevent — many times over.

But we are not impressed with Theresa May either. She was the best possible candidate to succeed David Cameron last summer, but only because the alternatives were worse. Many British voters could make the same calculation this week. Read more

Four-Party Talks to Form Dutch Government Collapse

Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte negotiates with other party leaders in The Hague
Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte negotiates with other party leaders in The Hague (Tweede Kamer)
  • Four-party talks in the Netherlands to form a coalition government have collapsed.
  • Edith Schippers, the outgoing health minister who led the negotiations, told reporters immigration was the most divisive issue. Read more